Texas Whiskey Talk

Ep #4 - Gulf Coast Distillers, Distillery Tour

November 15, 2019 Justice Season 1 Episode 4
Texas Whiskey Talk
Ep #4 - Gulf Coast Distillers, Distillery Tour
Show Notes Transcript

This show is Part 1 of a two part series, where the Weave and I visit Gulf Coast Distillers in Houston, Texas. In this episode, we did a walking and talking type interview with Julian Geraldo, the Head Distiller at Gulf Coast Distillers. Julian walked us all through the distillery and took us cradle to grave through the whole operation. Watch the episode all the way through because Julian provides little Easter eggs of info throughout.

Julian ran us through the unique history of Gulf Coast Distillers which is intertwined with coffee and rice industry. He also told us about Dave Pickerell’s involvement in shaping the operation. As you know, Dave Pickerell was the Master Distiller at Maker’s Mark for 14 years before he started his own consulting firm that advised over 100 craft distilleries. He was a legend in the whiskey world and Gulf Coast Distillers was one of his last consults before he passed in November of 2018. 

These guys are in the process of installing two continuous column stills they purchased from Makers Mark. There is no question Gulf Coast Distillers is the largest distillery in Texas with an operation that will rival MGP some day.

Support the show
Intro Music:

[ Intro Music ]

Justice:

Howdy folks, Justice here with another episode of Texas Whiskey Talk, the voice of the Texas Whiskey Experience. This show is part one of a two part series where the Weave and I visited Gulf Coast Distillers in Houston, Texas. So as a new show, we're figuring out this whole podcasting and YouTubing thing. So we're trying some new interview techniques, trying some new kit. In this episode, we did a walking and talking tour with Julian Geraldo , the Head Distiller at Gulf Coast Distillers. And we also used a new gimbal camera camera to see if we could get some cool shots. Some apologies up front on sound quality. The distillery was in full operation while we're walking around and going in and out of buildings. So you've got some background noise. You got some wind noise scattered throughout. Also, during the interview it may look like I'm pointing a taser at Julian the whole time. But uh , he's not under duress. Just me with my portable audio recorder. Julian walked us through the entire distillery. He took us through their operation cradle to grave. You're gonna wanna watch this episode all the way through. Cause Julian just lays all sorts of Easter eggs of great information. He ran us through the history of Gulf Coast Distillers and how it's intertwined with the coffee and rice industry. He also told us about Dave Pickerell's involvement in shaping the operation. And many of you probably already know Dave Pickerell , Master Distiller at Maker's Mark for 14 years and he went off and started his own consulting firm where he advised a hundred plus craft distilleries across the United States. He was just a legend in the whiskey world and Gulf Coast Distillers was one of his last consults before he passed away in November of 2018. Also, these guys are in the process of installing two continuous column stills that they purchased from Maker's Mark. There's just no question. Gulf Coast Distiller's is the largest distillery in Texas and these guys are going to have an operation that rivals MGP some day . Many of you are listening to this podcast or listening to this via podcast. You're gonna wanna watch this on YouTube to truly appreciate how massive the operation is at Gulf Coast Distillers. When they called their bourbon giant, Giant Texas Bourbon. It is just an understatement. If you enjoy this episode, join the Texas Whiskey Nation and support our show by following us on Facebook and Instagram at Texas Whiskey Experience and on Twitter at Texas Whiskey EXP. Also, make sure you're subscribing to Texas Whiskey Experience on YouTube and Texas Whiskey Talk on iTunes, Google Play, and Spotify. And if you want links to the show, sent directly to your inbox, go to our website, TexasWhiskeyExperience.com and subscribe to our newsletter. Lastly, in the month of November, we have lots of swag on the way to include shirts, some hats, coasters, glassware, you name it. We're launching our online store and our Patreon page just in time for the holidays. And with that, enjoy the show. Cheers. Howdy folks. Justice here with another episode of Texas Whiskey Talk, the voice of Texas Whiskey Experience today we're taking you to Houston, Texas, to Gulf Coast Distillers. Uh , as always, I'm joined by my co-host the Weave who is our camera man today because we're going to be doing some walking and talking, touring Gulf Coast Distillers. And we're here with Julian Geraldo , the head distiller here at Gulf Coast Distillers. Julian, welcome. Thanks for having us out.

Julian:

Thanks for coming over here. Thanks. Uh, We are , we are very excited to have you guys here.

Justice:

So Julian, tell us how you got into distilling.

Julian:

Well, eh, it's a long story, eh, this plant used to be a, it is, it's still like a coffee plant, eh, I worked with the coffee plant for 12 years. I'm the operation manager of the coffee plant also. So the owner of this place decided to set up a , or to diversify the business five years ago. So he started out up a distillery, eh, we started pulling the permits. It took a long way to , to get there. And then eh we started with a bottling facility in the building. Next door. We have a bottling facility. Eh, initially we were sourcing our barrels, right. But if we wanted to eh go from the grain to the glass and that's how the idea of the distillery came up, right. Eh . So we have been in op operation for over two years and we're about to open our tasting room. And so the we are very, very excited about it.

Justice:

Awesome. When do you think the tasting room's going to open?

Julian:

Eh, we're just waiting on a few permits. I will say maybe a month or two from now.

Justice:

Okay. So you moved over to the distilling operation. So what kind of training did you have?

Julian:

Well, it was a very short learning curve. Eh, well, we wanted to put the expertise that we had in the manufacturing process. Eh, we had been working with eh food for over 25 years and this was meant to be a grain silo facility since it was built. And this used to be the old Uncle Ben's rice plant. So the owner turned the plant into uh coffee handling facility . Right. Then when he opened that , the [inaudible] distillery he, a, I was very involved with the coffee back then and he said, why don't you get a little bit more involved with the distillery cause I want to see those numbers picking up. So, that's how I got involved there, eh , we put together our expertise in manufacturing and we brought in eh David Pickerell as a consultant. So they acknowledged the knowledge that he has on making whiskey, plus our expertise in manufacturing. We put those two things together and that's how the distillery came into place, right. Eh, additionally to eh hiring, David Pickerell as a consultant. We also hired eh , Troy Smith, eh , he was the previous distiller from Yellow Rose and he was the one who started up distilling with us. Then, down the road we also hired another, a good distiller from a Venezuela, his name is Elio Omar . He was the head distiller of a Dosa. That's a rum , a rum distillery that is located in Venezuela. It's owned by Diageo . So he brought in all the experience of a mass production of whiskey and uh spirits. And along with the , the knowledge and the expertise from Troy, from Troy Smith, we put, we put those two guys together to ramp up the distillery . So I was like shadowing them all the time, eh. So that along with the visit from David Pickerell gave me all the basics for , so to start understanding that the distillation distillation process.

Justice:

So he's, so Dave Pickerell, kind of a legend in the business. So you guys were one of his last consults before he passed away is my understanding . So can you kind of tell us what he does when he shows up? What does that process look like? I mean, did you guys have a mash bill and he came and tweaked it or he came in and helped walk you guys through it in building a mash bill?

Julian:

No, we had mash bills. Right. But I mean, dealing with David Pickerell , eh, it's so easy because he's a guy that is very like down to the ground. He eh and he will tell you the things straight up how they are. Right? So he saw, he saw our mash bills and he said , no, you need to change this. You need to change this . Eh, he, he, he taught us how to use a malted barley with a , as a , as an enzyme. We were using a synthetic enzymes. So all those little things. Also eh he helped us to develop our pot stills. We have a very unique, eh , pot stills that you will see that later. Okay. So, eh, he helped us uh to, to design and develop those pot stills. And he also b rought down some guidelines for, for us to follow a t d uring the fermentation and distillation process. So he basically, eh , rearranged all the mash bills that we had and he gave us the, the, the list of things that we need to take into consideration where we're doing all the subsequent steps of the distillation parts.

Justice:

So how long does he come in for? How long is that?

Julian:

He was here when he came here, like three or four times. But all the process took about about a year.

Justice:

Fantastic.

Julian:

Yeah. Yeah , he was fantastic, man. We, we are really thankful that we had a chance to work with him.

Justice:

So, the mash bill t hat y'all came up with, I mean, w ere y'all chasing a particular flavor profile and he helped you zero in on that flavor profile or?

Julian:

Yes, we want it to start up with our very classic bourbon. Eh. We didn't want to go too crazy just to start. So eh our mash bill is a , a high rye mash bill is like 20 20 21% rye, eh, eh, bourbon , eh, but he also helped us to develop other, eh , mash bills for more for like a premium or premium selection or to do like small batches. So he also helped us to develop the mash bill for our wheated bourbon. We have some, eh small production of wheated bourbon and for our rye, of course, we have a, we have done three different types of mash billls for the rye. Right now we're doing uh 95% rye, 5% malted barley.

Justice:

What's that one called?

Julian:

Eh, we , we call it Pickerell's Special Blend. Yeah.

Justice:

Oh nice. Yup, yup, yup. Yup. Very cool.

Julian:

Yeah.

Justice:

So what do we get behind us here?

Julian:

So behind us, we have the original blueprints of this building. That is something that you don't see at any other distillery. This is our very historic building, a very linked to the history of [inaudible] Houston. As I was telling you guys before, this used to be the old Uncle Ben's plant rice, eh, back in the 1940s, eh , uh, German British chemist developed a way to a modify the rice. Also , you will have more protein, right? So it's called, that's called converted rice. So Mr Forrest Forrest Mars Mars from Mars Inc he, he partnership with him. I have to set up a plant where here in Houston, Texas, because in that, eh, during those days there was a bunch of rice over here. So they started up this plant , they run the plant from the 1940s all the way to the 1990s. Eh, in this plant, all their rice for the military was produced there . The people that were in war because that converted rise , eh ? It was, it had to had high a high nutrients. It was a , eh , sleeps roof. So he wouldn't get any slips . And it was easy for the, for the soldiers in the war to prepare [inaudible] of how could , so the department of defense to covert this building for a period of 20 years just to produce the right for the military, right? So they run it for four women since the 1948 all the way to the 1990s then they relocated the plant and it was vacant for a few years. And that's when the owner, the actual owner, so an opportunity to turn into a coffee processing plant because we have the all Maxwell house just down the street. So we were receiving all the green coffee that is going to be used in that plant for roasting. So a

Speaker 5:

huge silo facility with high capacity, over 10 million pounds of coffee. Right? Eh. So we decided to start to set up a new branch for the distillery because we already know how to handle grains. So we sold that. It was a big opportunity for us and we, we saw that it was booming, so he wasn't the time to do set up with a new business. Speaking of distilleries. You want to take us on a tour? Yeah . Okay . We're following you. Okay, perfect. Let's come . Please wait. So we're walking into the distillery, eh? Ah , I would say a medium sized , considering it's called little size, because I will , I'm going to show you a surprise later on. Okay . We have an expansion and expansion project going on that is gonna make us look big now. Okay. So let's walk into our grain silos a little bit. Let me show you where we start our grain. Okay. Following you.

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Speaker 5:

Oh, her grades 120,000 pounds . H right? [inaudible] number three is for the corn. You'll see it . Yellow corner low number two is for the rye . So you're looking number one, it's called the multiparty . Right. Okay. From here, we're going to move the brace all the way up to the third floor. [inaudible] okay. You're gonna be lower grade [inaudible] and then we're going to speed up our match stone from that phone by your , that you see sticking up above the building . Right? Okay. So let me or match done . Alright .

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Speaker 5:

cool . But did you tell her Mapstone right. You have 2,600 gap. We're doing our math. They're following the mass fuels that were developed by David [inaudible] . And then from here we have five fermentors . We have 3% of the capacity of 300 gallon tank top and gun . Eh , we do a sweet mash process. We're not doing sour mash by them . We're Princeton training because Howard met. Right. And why are you, why are you transitioning? Because we want to have more consistency in our products. Yeah . And also to keep by the food environment for the yeast to grow. So we're, where are you getting your grain from? A , we get the grains from a local farmer in Texas. He is a located in Texas. Okay. And we study studied for him from different very first day with him. And so we don't have a middle guy. We deal directly with the guy who is growing the corn. Okay. What about the rye and barley? Rye? And we're dealing with these guys from MBS . So they were providing us with 100% texts brain . Okay. The way we can call our product a hundred percent Texans . We're very proud of that. And that's where you always look for a Texan brain . Okay. Um , so why do you think this a medium size facility? Because I mean, I've been to other of this filler is I've seen their capacities and I think we're , we did not raise it . No , let's not talk about texting . You guys are advertising, you're the biggest distillery in Texas. Once we put our to call them into operations that were going to be the larger distillery, we want to be the larger distillery on the West side of the Mississippi. That's how we going . Okay. Yeah. So we're, we're, we're not quite there yet. We're not quite there yet, but we have a command for that and we're shooting for that. Okay. So I will call you about an , about that expansion later. So, eh, after permit days , Jordan , we'll do this today. These , our three pots seals very unique pieces of equipment. You'll see a potstill like these anywhere else. Right? Right. And the reason why there are different is because they are not potstills they're in, they were initially built as if operator, right? Right. So if the owner of [inaudible] be sending industrial engineer, so I started building this visceral engineer. He does same buys . The thing is building you feel things, right? So we had to modify the [inaudible] operators to work as a potstill. As you guys can see, there is nothing but the stainless steel, you don't see any copper. Right? So we had to add those on use that you see on the neck. So we can pack it with copper. So there is corporate PAC in that own unit . Natalie guarantee the copper interacts of my papers . Right. Okay. Eh , very short. Did you? Oh miss Rio . The pod seals is very simple and you'll see they have a very short neck . That's because we want to keep all those impurities. We want to make a very bold, right . You saw was eh, approved by David Pickerell . We came up with the design. You saw it hit this field in those, in these box seals . And he said, okay, you can do it like that. Right. So we modify them so many times that some days I, I got you say they look like a Frankenstein. Right. And that's what they named Frank K. Brown . So we had front one, two and three. And you said Dave Pickerell had y'all do something with the design. What did he tweak exactly? Hey , can you tweak the length of the neck? Okay. And he made us reduce the size of this contentment because he was, he went wasn't very long, so we had to shorten the neck and they [inaudible] obviously he said, you guys need to add corporates somewhere. So that's where we came up. The idea with the , with the [inaudible] . Okay. Did you get taste stuff before

Justice:

and after his tweaks?

Speaker 5:

Eh, yes. And he made a really good difference. I mean, before, when we were , because before we didn't have, the next one was like a straight shouting into the condenser. A lot of acid in our DC analysis . I'm sorry if any thought you was when I gave this a very harsh flavor in our whiskey. So we said we decided no, we need to give you more reflux. And that's when we extended those next .

Justice:

So do y'all, how many, so when you're making a batch of a bourbon, are you doing a stripping run and a finishing run? Are you just doing one?

Speaker 5:

Yeah, we're doing that. The two steps for us is we're doing stripping run first and then we do a second destination , which is the spirit from where we did the cuts.

Justice:

So how, how long does that whole process take to do a ,

Speaker 5:

well, eh , in our case, if these are a thousand gallon, eh , pods deals for our stripping process, we usually take a between five to six hours. Now for the spirit process here is something that we do a little bit different. We do very slow distillation, very, very slow distillation. We'd start phase leading up into power production in order to do a slow this today. So we'll have our really , we , eh, eh, consistent cuts , right? Okay . So we go very slow in their heads. And then once we pass that part, we just crank it up a little bit. So in the end or destinations take up to 12 to 14 hours. Oh wow. Yeah . Okay. So how much product are y'all cranking out a week? We're cranking quite up here , you know, depends on the product that we are running right there . Let's say four in the matching process or house mass . They arrive when we're doing right, he takes longer than when we do the bourbon. That's because we have a limited capacity on day grinder . So we have to grind two batches when we're doing the ride. So you have to wait for the second batch to be in. So that makes it for us that a little bit longer. And also when we're doing, eh, eh, I'll take one . When we're doing ride, we will do ledge poops for wig . Obviously that was going to be less installations per week. Right. Okay . That's it . Various bad on an average, I can tell you that we're producing around 80 barrels a week. 80 barrels a week. Wow. Yup . That's impressive. Okay. Yep . What else in here? Okay. So this is our current setup , right? And right now we're shooting for $300 a month and we are looking to expand our capacity. So let me show a little bit about that extra X expansion project. Okay. [inaudible] so we're setting up is distillation column a was running maker's Mark for like 12 years. David [inaudible] curl is spotted for us. He was like sitting in the backyard in Kentucky and we bought it. We brought it in. And eh, the idea is that once we put this into operation, we are going to be the largest distillery in Texas. I'm probably the largest of the West side of Mississippi. I'm 42 feet high column, eh , 42 inches in diameter, 23 plates, rectification column next to it. In order to keep this guy alive, we need a bigger mass stone . So this is our master 10,000 gallons capacity. Right? And you might be wondering, where are we going to far mental days , right? I'm gonna need a lot of fermented fermentation space. So let me take you where we have our familiars . Are the columns still going to be continuous? Yeah. Yeah. Interesting.

Justice:

So, so you're saying, so your biggest distillery, Texas, you're going off of the capacity of your stills. Are you going off of the ,

Speaker 5:

the output ? How are y'all, how are y'all measuring that? Well, that's a really good question. Yeah, because a , we are measuring out that the capacity of this feels right, right. But a , obviously we cannot have this column operated 24 seven right? Right. So that's, that's where a bit expertise of our upper management department comes into place to bring, because we want know we want to source federal for Texas. We went up be a absorbent pedals for all that small texts of distilleries. You want to take a little bit of a little chunk of all the other guys from up North and let's, let's have some Texan whiskey available for this whole distillers in Texas. So that's what we're shooting for . I was telling him , I was telling weed that you guys can be that the MTP of Texas, that's where we would have been . Yeah . Yeah. That's where we're heading. Yeah, totally guys, eh , our a fermentation space . Right. Okay, great.

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Justice:

what do you think? It's, yeah, it's giant. So giant is an understatement. This place is massive. Yeah. Yup .

Julian:

So if you turn it right, we have these silos where we [inaudible]

Speaker 5:

the coffee, as I was saying, [inaudible]

Julian:

the capacity of at 10 million pounds of coffee. Okay. And next to it is we're going to be for men in our maps , so six for a with capacity of 40,000 gowns each. Eh , bringing these guys from mission Texas was not easy. It's a oversized load. Yeah. And then we have to rent the crane to put the, the tanks into place and then we build this structure around the tanks.

Speaker 6:

Wow. Wow.

Julian:

When are these going to be operational? That's another good question. I will say maybe one year from now.

Speaker 5:

So one to right now you're cranking out 80 barrels a month, you said, and that once all this is online, how much do you think you're gonna be cranking out? We foresee a bump into maybe a between a thousand percent of the ball in, in our, our capacity. So if we can make 300 now we will be able to make 30,000 or so.

Speaker 6:

Wow.

Speaker 5:

Game changer. Okay.

Speaker 6:

That is impressive. What , what next?

Speaker 5:

How bout a list? It tastes some of our whiskeys taste some of the whiskey. Yeah. Well you know we, we , we have to go first to our barrel warehouse and I'll , I'll show you a little bit of what we're doing with the boroughs . That's also something that we're making a little bit different over here. Okay . We get out . Okay, let's go over there. What's the red vessel there? And we're gonna not use the critical tone . It's going to be four . If there was going to be our ink . Okay. It's going to keep fitting the columns and that eh tank that you see next to the columns is going to be our sour water, my air tank. So from Durbin and a pump that there's this hour water into our mash down us have as the back seat . And what do you see out there? Is that liquids to solid separator. So we're separating there , this solids from the leaf

Justice:

and we have a farmer that is coming every week to pick up all the solids for his cattle. Okay. And one more thing about the column. I mean, you're talking about the copper interaction. I'm not , is that copper? I can't really go outside while they're all Ty . Wally's not copper, but inside everything is covered. Okay. Yeah. Well the place everything is covered. Gotcha.

Speaker 5:

So is this all the barrels here? Yeah, we'll talk. That's what I was telling you. So, eh , what we do here is that we will keep the boroughs and these a hot environment, which is a metal roof for the first six months. We want to accelerate that aging process during those first six months, and then we're going to move their us to the room next door, which is a concrete room. It's that much cooler environment . So we're going to slow down a little bit . That aging process. Okay. So let's walk in there and you'll see that the change in the temperature when you walked in [inaudible]

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Speaker 5:

yeah. You see the difference?

Speaker 6:

[inaudible]

Julian:

Oh wow. Just keeps going. Okay. Yeah. This is our barrel warehouse. We have most of our ballots in this area. We are, eh, getting approval from TTB to get, eh , uh , they warehouse next door also approved to store barrels. Right. And that's also a concrete warehouse. So it's also a cooler environment, eh, we have a, we airflow in that warehouse as well as here. We have exhaust fans everywhere to keep to make sure the air keeps flowing. Okay. Eh, we rotate our barrels so we don't have that sweet spot in the middle or nothing like that. We , we periodically have a guy with a forklift, eh , moving the palate from the top to the bottom. Really ? Yeah . Yeah. Getting all those barrels back in cycles. We have to do a monthly inventories, so. Okay . Yeah . Since as we count the barrels we will , we would rotate them. So his making your barrels for you right now where you're getting the pros from eh, Speyside cooperage , but we are doing the transition to ISE . The next batch of barrels that we're going to get are going to be [inaudible] .

Speaker 6:

Okay. Did we lose a char for our Barton ?

Justice:

So what's the total barrel capacity in here? Well, we wrote , we just passed the 3000 barrels. Yeah . In this, in this particular up and the new building that you're expanding how as many as you want. The thought is that it's a big, it's a big plate. Yeah . A big , a big area. Okay. So on your barrel aging, it seems like most of your products are like six to 24 months old.

Julian:

Yeah. Our oldest girl is two years old. Yeah. The first batches. Yeah. They started cooking one 17 2007 to eight . Yeah. End of 2016 at the beginning of 2017 we did a few small batches, but yeah, we have some barrels from May, 2017

Justice:

Dean . So can you walk us through like the future with, with the whiskey or y'all, where do y'all think your sweet spots gonna be on aging whiskey? Well,

Julian:

eh, that's a matter of discussion right now. We, we've been like going back and forth between all of us because some of, some of we as of right now are with Carberry green forward whiskeys . Uh , but we , we want to add that nutmeg, eh, from the barrels. So I will prefer to leave the whiskey at least four years in the barrel. Right. Okay. Obviously it all depends on the market. I mean we have a lot of people asking for our parents, so eh, we're trying to handle the inventory very wisely so we will just keep a reserve for our aging product .

Justice:

Okay. Do you feel you can do the longer aging peers ? You've got a little bit of cooler space for it , a lot of clothes , two years of aging in Texas that just, yeah, too much.

Julian:

But I mean, as you see, this is a very cool environment. It's not a , I mean most of the whiskeys in Texas, if you see 'em at their warehouses, they are , they're very hot. So we have the advantage because this is a big building, so it keeps the temperature down. Also in the warehouse. Next door is the same situation. So yeah, that, that makes us, that flexibility to let the Barrows age per a little bit longer. I don't want to leave him for too long, but I ugliest , I would like to live in port for years in the bottle to see how it comes out. So what's your entry proof when you're, we feel all of our barrels at one 20 proof.

Justice:

One 20 yep . And then what, what are y'all experiencing with the humidity? Is the proof going up or down?

Julian:

Yeah. Well it all depends home where the barrel is sat . That's what we decided to rotate the barrels . Right? Eh, eh, we, we have experienced a yield loss of 10 to 11% in the first year. Okay . And then it goes down to four or 5% the subsequent years. Right. So what else? Anything else in here or, Oh, well in here we have our , all of our barrels here, we have a small batches of interesting stuff. We have some, for example, we have some Canadian whiskey being aged in bourbon barrels and we also have some Brandy. We got so eh, or instruments cat from a winery in the Texas Hill country and we have a aging toasted barrels. So that's also something very interesting that we're doing. We have corn whiskey, eh, additionally to our favorite traditional and mash bills. So we're trying to diversify our portfolio of parallels so we'll have different things to offer.

Speaker 6:

Okay. So looks like they're using lately the larger [inaudible]

Julian:

yeah, we're using 53 gallon and Barrows only the brand, they went into 63 gallons. Which are those guys that you see down there.

Justice:

So down the road, I mean since you're going to be supplying product to um , other folks in Texas, what do you think the percentage is going to be on your business? What's your producing for your inhouse lines and what you're going to be providing for know source and other distilleries? What do you think that breakdown is going to be if you're going to be the MGP? If Texas [inaudible]

Julian:

yeah, what's that gonna look like? Well, eh, it all depends on how many barrels we have to offer. I think as of right now we already sourcing, there are some companies getting barrels from us and, but it's a very small percentage. We wanted that to increase. So I will say maybe a 60 40 because we also need to keep some for our , for our production. Okay . Ours hour a whiskey, it's barely growing in Texas , Texas region. And since we did the transition from source barrels to two hour whiskey, we've seen that people are liking it more. So we really want to expand that area and we're really that AE our business to grow. So eh, the star of our show is always a giant Texas whiskey and that's the era that we would like to grow. But additionally, we can source barrels for four distilleries in the Texas region. I mean , that will compliment our business. So I would say maybe a 60 40 it will be a good proportion for that . Okay,

Speaker 6:

great.

Justice:

Do you want to head to the tasting room where you got something else? I'm getting thirsty and we're getting thirsty. A lot of talking. All right , so you think you're gonna stick with this for the long haul? The distilling side of the business? Yeah, I love it. I mean it's, it's a learning [inaudible]

Speaker 5:

periods and I love , just love my job. I mean that's , that's all I need to be happy.

Justice:

What's your workload looking like here? To nonstop. Nonstop. Yeah. Looks good .

Speaker 5:

I like to stay busy and I think we have a really good opportunity here to grow. We're doing things right. We, we've got with the right people, so I think we're heading in the right direction.

Speaker 6:

Awesome.

Justice:

You were gonna say something about the brewery on the way out here. Yeah. So we do, we're sitting out views , real worried because I mean, besides walk over here,

Julian:

we wanted to have a complimentary product to the whiskey , right? So we are setting out these a 40 barrels, a brewery, brew house, eh, he was also studied in our yard of somebody. If the owner saw the opportunity to bring it into place. And that's where we are studying up right now. This is where we focus right now. And we wanted to have, as I say, something different to whiskey in the tap room for the people who don't like whiskey. So, eh, besides take coffee and whiskey and beer, I mean those are the three things you need to live , right? So we want , we've heard those sort of things here. He wants to offer it to the people. All of our products.

Justice:

Sir , are you going to be in charge of this too? Are you going to have a brew master work in this? Have a brew Matthew ? I think I did . Okay. All right . Well let's just hit that onto the tasting room. And when does that, when's the brewery coming online?

Julian:

That's gotta be within a month, month or two. Oh wow . Yeah . Yeah .

Justice:

Do you guys know what kind of

Julian:

beer are going to be? Well, we're going to start with the easy beers, right? It's weird . We're learning. Eh? We just bought a , a brand, eh, from, eh, it's called [inaudible] beer. They were produced by a company called big bend brewery. Okay. Shut . They shut down. And so we bought their brands, eh ? Sorry . We're going to start with a , with a light beer. More like a blown

Speaker 5:

okay. Yeah. And that's going to be our first beer and then we're just going to start. It's got enough. Ooh , we got luck. Huh ?

Justice:

Well that's gotta be the end of the show. No tasting room today.

Speaker 5:

Okay, let me just grab the keys real quick. Are you all open from ,

Justice:

well folks, that's it for part one of this two part series at Gulf coast distillers. Tune in for our next episode where we sit down with Julian in Benz din , the fantastic tasting room at Gulf coast distillers , Julian, Texas, through a tasting of their entire line of Texas whiskeys , and he shares in the more information about their operation. The grand opening of Ben's [inaudible] is scheduled for November 16th special thanks to alley , that tasting room manager at Gulf coast distillers who coordinate our visit, and a huge thank you to Julian for taking the time to show us around and providing us with an incredible tour. Once again, if you enjoy the show today, join the Texas whiskey nation and follow the Texas whiskey experience on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and subscribe to our channels on YouTube, iTunes, Google, play, Spotify. Give us a Lite and send us your comments with that. Cheers.

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] .